PyCon 2014 Day 3: The big day is here!

So I apologize right now, if you consider these blog posts too much! I don’t usually get much time to write some blog posts but I thought I would share some great talks and my notes on a few of them.

Today, was the “official” first day of PyCon with some awesome Keynote speakers and also big talks. Again, this is my first PyCon so I was a bit new to talk tracks. However, I think I found all of the talks interesting that I attended 🙂

KeyNote

The main keynote was given by John Perry Barlow and it was a fun and pleasurable talk about privacy and policy. Had me chuckling, and at times made some very good points. Talked about how we should have a lack of secrecy, and how we should not be afraid about large controlled corporations. Nice talk to listen too.

Computer Science Fundamentals for Self-Taught Programmers

Took this talk to get a grip of the big O notation as that has been one of my bigger weaknesses when it comes to programming. Big O notation (O(n)) is a way developers talk about the theoretical measure of the execution of an algorithm. At the end of a day, algorithm is just a fancy way of saying a recipe (a step by step guide on how to do something). While big O notation is very important, for really small sample sizes, it can not just matter. Always remember that theoretical speed is different than practical speed. In short, unless you are coding for large datasets this is probably not going to make your app faster. With all this being said it is still something you should be familiar with because it allows you to discuss your code in an organized format with other developers. I still need some work in this domain regardless but I honestly just need to refocus because I was able to do this roughly a year ago. That’s what happens when you don’t hone your craft! 🙂

So you want to be a full stack developer?

This talk briefly touched a ton of tools available for a full stack setup. I consider myself a full stack developer in that all (almost all) of my code is essentially written and maintained by me from beginning to end. This talk was useful not in the sense of planning, but finding out what is out there in the world! I got a list, and I am not going to bore you with a long winded list, but if you wish. Please reach out and I can share!

Python Web Scraping Showdown

In a short demo, @kjam, talked about different web scraping utilities in Python and how they differ in speed. In short, lxml with xpath was the fastest, lxml with css was a close second, and finally BeautifulSoup came in last. With that being said, at the end of the day, the results weren’t that much different. I would say, use what is easiest to read and understand.

Link: https://github.com/kjam/python-web-scraping-tutorial

Ansible – Python Powered Automation  #3

Things I like about Ansible:

  • Agentless (no remote resources used)
  • Keeps things simple
  • Auditable
  • Batteries are included (Close to 250 plugins in core)

I think the only issue I see is that we have committed to puppet and salt, but I definitely don’t disregard Ansible as a powerful tool. In fact, it may become a leader in this domain. It has BLOWN up on Github in the past year.

Puppet Modules: Apps for Ops  #2

I attended this talk to see if there were any gotchas in our setup. I use puppet at the moment, but I think I was recently won over by Salt. 🙂

Link: https://speakerdeck.com/jbronn/puppet-modules-apps-for-ops

Getting Started with SaltStack  #1

I recently fell in love with salt after the heartbleed mess in the past week. I was tasked with finding out all our server config to see what needed to be patched. In a short salt command on our master, I ran the following command and did a complete inventory of our openssl versions:

sudo salt * cmd.run “openssl version” >> out.txt

Aside from this, I like the whole Jinja2 (coming from a django background) and yaml based config files. I also like the level of granularity (haha a pun…go figure :p). I am also interested in their Salt Reactor. Basically you can listen in to events that occur, and “react” to them in a proper fashion. It uses Zeromq implementation which in itself if kind of interesting. I have not read much about it but looks like a cool setup. 😀

Link: https://speakerdeck.com/ipmb/getting-started-with-salt

Reactor: http://docs.saltstack.com/en/latest/topics/reactor/

Application Deployment State of the Onion

Watch this video….Fast…and less than 30 minutes. Probably the greatest talk of the day in my book. No nonsense and straight to the point.

Writing Idiomatic Python

I got around to meeting up with Jeff Knupp, author of the book Writing Idiomatic Python, and we had a little meetup in one of the huddle rooms. Discussed a bit about writing a book and some of the challenges, and we got to discuss what it means to be idiomatic. There were a few people who had some comments on some of the idioms of Python, but as Jeff pointed out. The book is not based on his opinion and he might share the same views as someone, but he is simply writing a book about the idioms that are accepted by Python as a whole. Very interesting talk and also got a signed book out of it.

All the PyCon videos and talks can be found at: http://pyvideo.org/category/50/pycon-us-2014

Day 4 recap coming tomorrow night!